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April 2019

Do Your Sums Before Buying the Feed You Need

By Mark Price 29 days ago

We are coming out of one of the toughest winters in terms of forage stocks in recent memory and although the grass is not blowing in the wind quite yet, there is light at the end of the tunnel. It is time to be planning forage stocks.

Investing in Your Soil and Getting the Basics Right Will Aid Crop Quality and Yield

By Paul Crump 1 month ago

We are facing unprecedented times, and farming along with other industries are having to ensure their businesses are as well positioned as they can be to manage the impact our withdrawal from the EU in whatever form that might be, will have.

The engine room and lifeblood of any farm is the soil, an element that has the potential to impact greatly on farm profitability. Knowing the fertility of your soils is key in determining the most efficient and cost-effective choices that should be made when using both fertilisers and manures.

Quality Forage Starts with Selecting the Right Mixture

By Adam Simper 2 months ago

A key factor in producing quality forage is a carefully planned reseeding programme revolving around the core principle that you should aim to reseed 15% of the farm each year.

It is estimated that reseeding costs £250/ acre, making it a major investment, which requires attention to detail throughout the process. The starting point to this is selecting the right grass seed mixture which will suit your end requirements.

Fertiliser Update- April 2019

By David Mitchell 2 months ago

Having seen some unseasonably high temperatures in February and March, the weather in the first week of April seems to be more in line with seasonal norms. As predicted prices have eased back, and the availability for CF product has improved, but not surprisingly following the period of good weather, supply has been outstripped by demand.

Milk Quality Measures Can Identify Missing Yield Potential

By Bethany May 2 months ago

An annual pattern of milk composition has been well recognized on dairy farms across the world for years, with the highest milk fat and protein concentration in milk observed during the winter and lowest occurring in the summer. This trend is manipulated solely by season, and impacts housed and grazing cows similarly. So, when we get to spring, and then turnout for some, and milk butterfats start to decline- how do we know if this is real milk fat depression or not?